Thursday, June 25, 2015

Soli Deo Gloria: A Biography of Lodewijk Wesselo - Part 3: Facing Adversity


Facing Adversity

May 1940 started out well for the Wesselo family. Antje Wesselo bought a car, a small Opel, on 1 May and spent the next few evenings driving her parents around Rotterdam and the surrounding towns.(1) But then 10 May 1940 dawned. Bright and early Antje came into her parent’s bedroom and woke her father.(2) The war with Germany had started. Lodewijk himself described the early days of the war in a letter:

“The air was full of plains, getting shot at by our soldiers. 4 am. I was already at the Maaskade, where the [German] water planes already bobbed calmly on the river, and soon we had to run as they opened fire, and we in the alley were right in the line of fire. As much as possible did we bring valuables to the safe, more could we not do, everything was set up to prevent theft! You cannot imagine the atmosphere of those days, the street was dug up in no time and shots were resounding, rest was not an option, nowhere was it safe for us, eventually we had fortified ourselves as best we could behind the sliding door of the storage room and the green stairs, […], 3 nights and 4 days we were there feeling the greatest turmoil, even connection with the neighbors was out of the question, every movement outside the door drew bullets. De conditions soon became worse, the bombs were hitting right and left, and the house was shaking. Soon we had no water anymore, were cold and tired. All of us were dressed completely, E[lisabeth] in her winter coat, Ant and I in a rain coat, we thought it was a waste to wear our good clothes! The day after Pentecost the situation reached an all-time low, so then we said goodbye to each other and didn’t know any better or we would be finished soon, we read psalm 23 by the light of a torch gave Grace and prayed to God. The house was shaking, but danger kept passing by us, when afternoon came the situation could go no longer and we had to leave. God granted us an open milk cart, with E[lisabeth] on the front and us on the back we could make our way out of the street […]. By luck of the draw we went to H[illegers]berg, where a friend of Ant[je] lives, very sweet did they take us in and after hald an hour we had to go into the basement. Bombs struck at 50 meters, destroyed houses and killed people, by nightfall we went on…

After a fearful night the morning of 14 May arrived – telling everything we went through is impossible, and still I do not understand the calm with which we saw everything, we had said goodbye to each other and life, perhaps that gave us calm and strength. Sad it was to see the exodus of all of Rotterdam, everyone dragging their belongings, we had a small suitcase nothing more but we’d go back for the rest tomorrow. The bombardment came, then the fire, we had no idea that all of old Rotterdam would perish, including our house […]. That afternoon, when everything was rubble we [the Netherlands] surrendered.”
(3)

But, occupation or not, life still went on. Also in May 1940, Elisabeth started to show the first clear signs of something that would probably be diagnosed as Alzheimer’s disease, although it’s never called that by name. She’s sixty-six years old, the city where she lived has just been bombarded and burned to the ground for a large part, but most of it escapes her and her memory is very bad.(4) Five years later, at the end of the war in 1945, her memory of the present day is nearly entirely gone – although she remembered the past pretty well, and as long as there’s someone around she can still do things herself.(5)

In June 1940 the family moved back to Rotterdam, into the home they would occupy until the death of Lodewijk.(6) Life went on, although the war was felt in all aspects of it. The jewelry store Lodewijk was manager of had to restrict sales in December 1941, and customers can only buy something if they also sell something back to the store due to shortages in materials.(7) But the worst was yet to come.

1. Rotterdam after the bombardment in May 1940, with many buildings destroyed.

In the last year of the war the situation for everyone in the Netherlands worsened. During this time period, Lodewijk also had to deal with health problems. In August of 1944 he was nearly done with radiation therapy for throat cancer,(8) and could finally whisper a bit after the operation to remove the tumor.(9) Not even a month later, Lodewijk got quite a scare as another spot was discovered on his throat.(10) Luckily this tumor turned out to be benign, but the small procedure to take a sample left him without a voice again.(11)

The winter of 1944-1945, known as the hunger winter because of its bad conditions, approached. The war heated up as allied forces worked together to stop Hitler, and in September 1944 the battle for the Netherlands truly began as allied forces liberated parts of the south of Netherland. But, Lodewijk and his family were in Rotterdam, still a long way away from freedom. They did notice the increased fighting, as in October 1944 bombs fell in the neighborhood where Lodewijk lived, fuel became unavailable and food was starting to get scarce.(12) On 22 December of the same year Lodewijk celebrated a very sober birthday, but he was gifted a bread, some milk, a piece of bacon, and a small bag of potatoes by customers – very welcome gifts in a time that the only foodstuff available was either on food stamps or for exorbitant prices on the black market.(13) Then, as an extra birthday present, just before Christmas 1944 Lodewijk got an official clean bill of health and he also had his voice back.(14) All’s well that ends well in this case.

Looking at the situation in December 1944, Lodewijk’s family was one of the more fortunate ones. Even though life was hard, they are in relatively good health and have no big complaints. The Germans had instituted a curfew, everyone had to be inside by six o’clock in the evening and were not allowed outside before six o’clock in the morning.(15) The days are very short for Lodewijk and his family, they go to bed between seven and seven-thirty, also to save fuel.(16) But while food was in short supply, the family did not have to go to the soup kitchen,(17) while many other residents of Rotterdam had to rely on that for their food.

January 1945, the depth of winter, saw food and fuel getting ever more scarce. Prices on the black market rose sky high, and for Lodewijk and his family enduring was the only thing they could do. Fuel rations were in short supply, and it is not unusual for Lodewijk to wait in line for over an hour only to go home without fuel.(18) While it’s cold, the heater, which is also used as a stove, is only turned on from around half past eleven in the morning to around five o’clock in the afternoon – there’s simply not enough fuel to keep it burning longer.(19) The family still eats every day, only now it’s porridge cooked with water.(20) Lodewijk is dreading having to eat sugar beets, although he admits it’s “possibly without reason.”(21)

In March the food situation for the family has gotten a little better, mainly because Lodewijk’s daughter Antje goes on long and sometimes dangerous hunts for food.(22) But her hard work pays off, as the family manages to eat some fresh vegetables every day and they are not reliant on the food kitchen.(23) However, despite Lodewijk’s dread of sugar beets, it has become one of the staples of the family diet.(24)

On 18 March 1945, a VI-bomb meant for Antwerp came down on Rotterdam by mistake. Sunday morning, around half past seven, the city was still slumbering – everyone was caught by surprise.(25) When Lodewijk wrote his brother Abraham the next day to let him know he and his family were fine, the amount of people dead from the bomb was not yet known, but Lodewijk is certain there are a lot.(26) The bomb crashed on a very populated area, and thousands of windows were shattered by the blast – including many in Lodewijk’s street.(27) The family was lucky, because if the bomb “had gone further for a few seconds” it would have struck very close to where Lodewijk was living.(28)

Around the end of April of 1945, it was clear to everyone that liberation was coming, but when exactly was still in question. News of Hitler’s suicide on 30 April 1945 reached Rotterdam that same day and coupled with mass food droppings it caused people to go into the streets that evening despite the German-dictated curfew.(29) However, liberation did not come – not even when Germany capitulated on the 4th of May. It was not until the 8th of May when units of the First Canadian Army moved into the city that the German troops finally retreated and Rotterdam was free once more.(30) The war was finally over and Lodewijk and his family had survived it, despite the frequent disasters befalling the city they lived in and the glaring lack of food and fuel at the end of the war.



Note:

Please note that there are several differences between this English, on-line version and the Dutch PDF/printed version. All sources of this English version are in full, whereas in the Dutch version for repeated use of the same source the short version of the footnote was used. This digital version will also have fewer pictures, because several pictures I used in the Dutch version are not allowed to be placed on-line, by request of the copyright holder. Where the Dutch version contains transcriptions of Lodewijk Wesselo's own written words, the English version contains translations of these words. Both transcriptions and translations were done by me.

Note about sources of the archive of Voorschoten:

While I was doing the research for this biography the archive of Voorschoten was located at the Regionaal Archief Leiden. Since then, the archive has been moved to the Gemeentearchief Wassenaar due to a collaboration between Wassenaar and Voorschoten.

Sources:

1. Lodewijk Wesselo (Rotterdam, Zuid-Holland) to “Willem en Mien” [Willem Lodewijk Wesselo and his wife Wilhelmina Johanna Kwak], letter, 10 September 1940; portfolio 3, doos 1, familiearchief Wesselo; familiearchieven: Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie, fa 00472; Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie (CBG), Den Haag, Zuid-Holland.
2. Lodewijk Wesselo (Rotterdam, Zuid-Holland) to “Willem en Mien” [Willem Lodewijk Wesselo and his wife Wilhelmina Johanna Kwak], letter, 10 September 1940; portfolio 3, doos 1, familiearchief Wesselo; familiearchieven: Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie, fa 00472; Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie (CBG), Den Haag, Zuid-Holland.
3. Lodewijk Wesselo (Rotterdam, Zuid-Holland) to “Willem en Mien” [Willem Lodewijk Wesselo and his wife Wilhelmina Johanna Kwak], letter, 10 September 1940; portfolio 3, doos 1, familiearchief Wesselo; familiearchieven: Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie, fa 00472; Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie (CBG), Den Haag, Zuid-Holland.
4. Lodewijk Wesselo (Rotterdam, Zuid-Holland) to “Willem en Mien” [Willem Lodewijk Wesselo and his wife Wilhelmina Johanna Kwak], letter, 10 September 1940; portfolio 3, doos 1, familiearchief Wesselo; familiearchieven: Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie, fa 00472; Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie (CBG), Den Haag, Zuid-Holland.
5. Lodewijk Wesselo (Rotterdam, Zuid-Holland) to “Bram & Riek” [Abraham Bernardus Wesselo and his wife Hendrika Johanna Wilhelmina Broer], letter, 5 March 1945; portfolio 3, doos 1, familiearchief Wesselo; familiearchieven: Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie, fa 00472; Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie (CBG), Den Haag, Zuid-Holland.
6. Lodewijk Wesselo, Brief Biographical Sketch, manuscript, 1947; portfolio 3, doos 1, familiearchief Wesselo, familiearchieven: Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie, fa 00472, Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie, Den Haag, Zuid-Holland.
7. Lodewijk Wesselo (Rotterdam, Zuid-Holland) to “Bram” [Abraham Bernardus Wesselo], letter, 13 December 1941; portfolio 3, doos 1, familiearchief Wesselo; familiearchieven: Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie, fa 00472; Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie (CBG), Den Haag, Zuid-Holland.
8. For my proof argument see: J.M., “Indirect Evidence for an Illness,” Tracing My Roots, 9 November 2012 (http://tracingmytreeroots.blogspot.nl/2012/11/indirect-evidence-for-illness.html).
9. Lodewijk Wesselo (Rotterdam, Zuid-Holland) to “Bram” [Abraham Bernardus Wesselo], postcard, 4 September 1944; portfolio 3, doos 1, familiearchief Wesselo; familiearchieven: Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie, fa 00472; Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie (CBG), Den Haag, Zuid-Holland.
10. Lodewijk Wesselo (Rotterdam, Zuid-Holland) to “Bram x Riek” [Abraham Bernardus Wesselo and his wife Hendrika Johanna Wilhelmina Broer], letter, 10 October 1944; portfolio 3, doos 1, familiearchief Wesselo; familiearchieven: Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie, fa 00472; Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie (CBG), Den Haag, Zuid-Holland.
11. Lodewijk Wesselo (Rotterdam, Zuid-Holland) to “Bram x Riek” [Abraham Bernardus Wesselo and his wife Hendrika Johanna Wilhelmina Broer], letter, 10 October 1944; portfolio 3, doos 1, familiearchief Wesselo; familiearchieven: Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie, fa 00472; Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie (CBG), Den Haag, Zuid-Holland.
12. Lodewijk Wesselo (Rotterdam, Zuid-Holland) to “Bram & Riek” [Abraham Bernardus Wesselo and his wife Hendrika Johanna Wilhelmina Broer], letter, 29 October 1944; portfolio 3, doos 1, familiearchief Wesselo; familiearchieven: Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie, fa 00472; Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie (CBG), Den Haag, Zuid-Holland.
13. Lodewijk Wesselo (Rotterdam, Zuid-Holland) to “Bram & Riek” [Abraham Bernardus Wesselo and his wife Hendrika Johanna Wilhelmina Broer], letter, 25 December 1944; portfolio 3, doos 1, familiearchief Wesselo; familiearchieven: Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie, fa 00472; Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie (CBG), Den Haag, Zuid-Holland.
14. Lodewijk Wesselo (Rotterdam, Zuid-Holland) to “Bram & Riek” [Abraham Bernardus Wesselo and his wife Hendrika Johanna Wilhelmina Broer], letter, 25 December 1944; portfolio 3, doos 1, familiearchief Wesselo; familiearchieven: Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie, fa 00472; Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie (CBG), Den Haag, Zuid-Holland.
15. Lodewijk Wesselo (Rotterdam, Zuid-Holland) to “Bram & Riek” [Abraham Bernardus Wesselo and his wife Hendrika Johanna Wilhelmina Broer], letter, 25 December 1944; portfolio 3, doos 1, familiearchief Wesselo; familiearchieven: Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie, fa 00472; Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie (CBG), Den Haag, Zuid-Holland.
16. Lodewijk Wesselo (Rotterdam, Zuid-Holland) to “Bram & Riek” [Abraham Bernardus Wesselo and his wife Hendrika Johanna Wilhelmina Broer], letter, 25 December 1944; portfolio 3, doos 1, familiearchief Wesselo; familiearchieven: Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie, fa 00472; Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie (CBG), Den Haag, Zuid-Holland.
17. Lodewijk Wesselo (Rotterdam, Zuid-Holland) to “Bram & Riek” [Abraham Bernardus Wesselo and his wife Hendrika Johanna Wilhelmina Broer], letter, 25 December 1944; portfolio 3, doos 1, familiearchief Wesselo; familiearchieven: Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie, fa 00472; Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie (CBG), Den Haag, Zuid-Holland.
18. Lodewijk Wesselo (Rotterdam, Zuid-Holland) to “Bram & Riek” [Abraham Bernardus Wesselo and his wife Hendrika Johanna Wilhelmina Broer], letter, 15 January 1945; portfolio 3, doos 1, familiearchief Wesselo; familiearchieven: Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie, fa 00472; Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie (CBG), Den Haag, Zuid-Holland.
19. Lodewijk Wesselo (Rotterdam, Zuid-Holland) to “Bram & Riek” [Abraham Bernardus Wesselo and his wife Hendrika Johanna Wilhelmina Broer], letter, 15 January 1945; portfolio 3, doos 1, familiearchief Wesselo; familiearchieven: Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie, fa 00472; Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie (CBG), Den Haag, Zuid-Holland.
20. Lodewijk Wesselo (Rotterdam, Zuid-Holland) to “Bram & Riek” [Abraham Bernardus Wesselo and his wife Hendrika Johanna Wilhelmina Broer], letter, 15 January 1945; portfolio 3, doos 1, familiearchief Wesselo; familiearchieven: Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie, fa 00472; Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie (CBG), Den Haag, Zuid-Holland.
21. Lodewijk Wesselo (Rotterdam, Zuid-Holland) to “Bram & Riek” [Abraham Bernardus Wesselo and his wife Hendrika Johanna Wilhelmina Broer], letter, 15 January 1945; portfolio 3, doos 1, familiearchief Wesselo; familiearchieven: Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie, fa 00472; Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie (CBG), Den Haag, Zuid-Holland.
22. Lodewijk Wesselo (Rotterdam, Zuid-Holland) to “Bram & Riek” [Abraham Bernardus Wesselo and his wife Hendrika Johanna Wilhelmina Broer], letter, 5 March 1945; portfolio 3, doos 1, familiearchief Wesselo; familiearchieven: Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie, fa 00472; Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie (CBG), Den Haag, Zuid-Holland.
23. Lodewijk Wesselo (Rotterdam, Zuid-Holland) to “Bram & Riek” [Abraham Bernardus Wesselo and his wife Hendrika Johanna Wilhelmina Broer], letter, 5 March 1945; portfolio 3, doos 1, familiearchief Wesselo; familiearchieven: Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie, fa 00472; Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie (CBG), Den Haag, Zuid-Holland.
24. Lodewijk Wesselo (Rotterdam, Zuid-Holland) to “Bram & Riek” [Abraham Bernardus Wesselo and his wife Hendrika Johanna Wilhelmina Broer], letter, 5 March 1945; portfolio 3, doos 1, familiearchief Wesselo; familiearchieven: Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie, fa 00472; Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie (CBG), Den Haag, Zuid-Holland.
25. Lodewijk Wesselo (Rotterdam, Zuid-Holland) to “Bram & Riek” [Abraham Bernardus Wesselo and his wife Hendrika Johanna Wilhelmina Broer], letter, 19 March 1945; portfolio 3, doos 1, familiearchief Wesselo; familiearchieven: Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie, fa 00472; Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie (CBG), Den Haag, Zuid-Holland.
26. Lodewijk Wesselo (Rotterdam, Zuid-Holland) to “Bram & Riek” [Abraham Bernardus Wesselo and his wife Hendrika Johanna Wilhelmina Broer], letter, 19 March 1945; portfolio 3, doos 1, familiearchief Wesselo; familiearchieven: Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie, fa 00472; Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie (CBG), Den Haag, Zuid-Holland.
27. Lodewijk Wesselo (Rotterdam, Zuid-Holland) to “Bram & Riek” [Abraham Bernardus Wesselo and his wife Hendrika Johanna Wilhelmina Broer], letter, 19 March 1945; portfolio 3, doos 1, familiearchief Wesselo; familiearchieven: Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie, fa 00472; Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie (CBG), Den Haag, Zuid-Holland.
28. Lodewijk Wesselo (Rotterdam, Zuid-Holland) to “Bram & Riek” [Abraham Bernardus Wesselo and his wife Hendrika Johanna Wilhelmina Broer], letter, 19 March 1945; portfolio 3, doos 1, familiearchief Wesselo; familiearchieven: Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie, fa 00472; Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie (CBG), Den Haag, Zuid-Holland.
29. Gemeentearchief Rotterdam, “Bevrijding” [Liberation], Brandgrens (http://appl.gemeentearchief.rotterdam.nl/brandgrens/index.php?Itemid=24&id=17&option=com_content&task=view : accessed 22 December 2012).
30. Gemeentearchief Rotterdam, “Bevrijding” [Liberation], Brandgrens (http://appl.gemeentearchief.rotterdam.nl/brandgrens/index.php?Itemid=24&id=17&option=com_content&task=view : accessed 22 December 2012).

Picture source:

1. Rotterdam after the bombardment, May 1940, picture; bild 146-2005-0003/CC-BY-SA, Deutsches Bundesarchiv. Used under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 German license.

Monday, June 22, 2015

My Family Archive

During the Christmas holiday of 2013 I undertook the large project of organized my family archive. With How to Archive Family Keepsakes by Denise May Levenick and proper archival materials in hand I started this project. I ended up filling 10 boxes, containing documents, pictures and some bound volumes as well as newspaper articles (separated from everything else but too valuable to throw away). I didn't get everything squared away, I still have two boxes of pictures, one box of artefacts and a big plastic bag with what I think are two photo albums to go. But at least the largest part of my collection of original documents and pictures is safely stored away.

Two of my archival boxes, one open to show the folders inside.

I ended up with 5 different collections – each collection has a different provenance, making it unnecessary to note the provenance of every document as all the papers and photographs in a collection share the same provenance. I also have a digital index of what is where, which makes it easy to find something if I need it. It also makes it very easy to add documents to the index when they go into their appropriate folders. For instance, I added a wedding invitation and a funeral card today.

One of my folders, with the two new additions on top.

Is this system perfect? Of course not. I'm not a museum with a climate controlled storage room. I don't have any training. And I do have to make allowances for space and money in storing my archive. On the other hand, I can guarantee my archive is now better able to stand the test of time then it was before.

The next big project will be digitizing everything. And probably at the same time entering the information into my genealogical program. After I've taken care of the last of the stuff that still needs to be added... Yes, this is the never ending story. But then, isn't all genealogy like that?

Friday, June 19, 2015

Visiting RootsTech 2015 from my Armchair

RootsTech is a global family history event taking place yearly in Salt Lake City, Utah in the USA. There are exhibitors and lots of interesting talks being given there and I'd love to go. But it's just not possible for me. Too expensive and no time. But that doesn't mean I have to miss it altogether - not in this digital age. Granted, the exhibitors can't be digitized, but the talks can and have been. And they're available for free!

So for the past few evenings, I've been watching some of the talks.

I liked Karen Auman's talk You've Mastered the Census and Basic Search, What Next? Despite it being US based, there was a lot of basic methodology discussed that is helpful wherever your ancestors lived. Even if you know most of it, there will still be some tips or simple reminders that made it worth watching. And she's a very good presenter.

Thomas MacEntee's talk Building a Genealogical Research Toolbox was great. Just the resources he introduces are worth watching it for. He's funny, he knows what he's talking about, and he gives you plenty of options and the information to decide what would work best for you.

Anne Leishman's talk Bring Your Ancestors Back to the Future was a bit too basic for me. It was about three different source types, with a very US centric focus, and it was really aimed at beginners. I also found her talk to be a bit disorganized at points.

Valerie Elkins' talk The Write Stuff. Leaving a Recorded Legacy: Personal Histories, Journals, Diaries, and Letters focusses on recording your life story for your descendants. This was mostly about the how, not the what, and I liked it a lot. Like Thomas MacEntee, Valerie Elkins presents options and gives you all the information you need to pick the best one for you.

I plan to watch several more talks that look interesting to me. Alison Taylor's talk Personal History Triage: How to Tell the Best Ten Stories of Your Life should be a good addition to Valerie Elkins' talk. Peter Drinkwater's talk Finding Your Family on Newspapers.com might be interesting if his techniques and tips work on other newspaper databases as well (like those of the Royal Library of the Netherlands). I'm also interested in Amy Archibald's talk Finding the Living Amongst the Dead: Using the Internet to Find Your Living Cousins. Luther Tychonievich's talk From Machine-Checkable Proofs to Purple Prose: Levels of Rigor in Family History Software could be interesting to me, depending on the specifics he'll be talking about. The same goes for Harrison Tang's Reimagining the Family Tree. Possibly interesting, depending on what he'll actually be talking about. Diahan Southard's talk Getting Started in Genetic Genealogy might be interesting as well, provided she doesn't simply explain how it works on the genetics level but also talks about actually getting tarted with it - how to request samples from people, etc. And I might watch the keynote talks as well.

All of these talks, and more, can be found on the RootsTech site under Watch 2015 Sessions. I can't guarantee how long they'll be available, so I'll definitely recommend you don't wait to check it out.

Wednesday, June 17, 2015

Soli Deo Gloria: A Biography of Lodewijk Wesselo - Part 2: Working Man


Working Man

Now a married man, Lodewijk Wesselo continued to work as a goldsmith in Voorschoten. Barely a year after his marriage his first child, Hendrik Wesselo, was born on 21 April 1900 in Voorschoten.(1) He was born too early and seven days later he passed away.(2, 3) About a year and a half later his second son was born, again too early, on 8 October 1901 in Voorschoten. He died after a day, and was thus officially considered stillborn and not named in his death certificate.(4) However, his parents held him in their arms and loved him for the short time he graced this earth. They named him Hendrik.(5)

Elisabeth gave birth to a third child on 1 November 1902 in Voorschoten.(6) Once again the child was born too early, only this time it was a girl they named Antje.(7) Unlike the two boys before her, Antje survived her premature birth. Perhaps it was the tragedy of three premature births, two which resulted in death, that had Lodewijk evaluating his faith. Whatever the reason, around 1903 he left the Dutch Reformed Church and joined the Reformed Churches in the Netherlands.(8)

In 1908 Lodewijk decided to try something different than being a goldsmith. With approval of his superiors at ‘Van Kempen en Zoon’, he went to work as a dock worker at the company ‘Hoogenraad en Wesselo – Motor pakschuitdienst’, an inland shipping company in The Hague.(9) But "The big prospects soon turned into disappointment. The heavy shifts + the cold in the winter of 1909 forced him to leave ship and dock and he considered himself happy to be back in the old, warm surroundings of the factory."(10)

Right after his return to the factory Lodewijk created what he himself considered one of his most interesting pieces.(11) He created the gold work as decoration for the psalter that was given to Princess Juliana by the Church Council of The Hague to commemorate her baptism on 5 June 1909. A crowned monogrammed J surrounded by orange branches on the front and in the corners four elegant rosettes. The gold lock has the baptismal date engraved on it. It is indeed a piece to be proud of.

While the change in career did not work out, Lodewijk was still ready for a change after being a goldsmith for twenty-three years. So around 1911 he went to work for the department “depot” which dealt with the sales of the products made in the factory. First he got instructions in the depot in The Hague,(12) then he started working as a shopkeeper and assembler in the jewelry store in Middelburg in 1912. And so Lodewijk and his family “switched the rural Voorschoten for the provincial Middelburg.”(13) In those days it was common in the more high class businesses to serve the customers in a ‘fancy’ coat. But because Lodewijk also worked in the backroom, where he was wearing his protective coat, he had to switch coats many times a day.(14) Both through his hard work and the economic situation during the First Word War – in which the Netherlands stayed neutral – the business bloomed.(15) Soon a goldsmith was hired, which meant Lodewijk didn’t have to keep changing his jacket anymore, and later a salesperson was hired.(16) In 1920 the business was sold.(17)

During the years in Middelburg, the company ‘Van Kempen en Zoon’ had merged with ‘De Koninklijke Begeer’ and ‘Jac. Vos en Co.’, and was now called ‘Begeer, Van Kempen & Vos.’ It was for this ‘new’ company that Lodewijk went to work as manager of the Rotterdam depot, situated in the Hoofdsteeg 26.(18) Lodewijk had nothing but good things to say about the customers in Rotterdam. “Very pleasant customers once you’ve got them. No complaining, few hesitations, listening to good advice, loyal and giving.”(19)

During this time, Lodewijk switched churched twice more. First he went from the Reformed Churches in the Netherlands to the Reformed Churches in the Netherlands (Liberated) around 1926, because of “The matter Geelkerken”.(20) This ‘matter’ was a theological dispute spearheaded by Dr. J.G. Geelkerken, where he pled for reading the Bible stories as allegories instead of literal stories. This led to a separation in the church, ending with Dr. Geelkerken and his followers forming their own church in 1926. Lodewijk was one of them. But the community didn’t satisfy him, so he and his family changed to the Dutch Reformed Church around 1930.(21) He was ahead of his time. In 1946 the entire Reformed Churches in the Netherlands (Liberated) joined the Dutch Reformed Church and as such ceased to exist.

In September of 1935 ‘Begeer, Van Kempen & Vos’ celebrated their centenary company anniversary, and during this party Lodewijk received the golden medal of merit.(22) Only a few years later, on 23 July 1938 Lodewijk celebrated his fiftieth year in the service of ‘Begeer, Van Kempen & Vos,’ at which time he received the golden medal of honor in the Order of Oranje-Nassau as well as the golden medal from the Dutch Society for Industry and Trade.(23) It was a last big celebration before troubled times would begin.


Note:

Please note that there are several differences between this English, on-line version and the Dutch PDF/printed version. All sources of this English version are in full, whereas in the Dutch version for repeated use of the same source the short version of the footnote was used. This digital version will also have fewer pictures, because several pictures I used in the Dutch version are not allowed to be placed on-line, by request of the copyright holder. Where the Dutch version contains transcriptions of Lodewijk Wesselo's own written words, the English version contains translations of these words. Both transcriptions and translations were done by me.

Note about sources of the archive of Voorschoten:

While I was doing the research for this biography the archive of Voorschoten was located at the Regionaal Archief Leiden. Since then, the archive has been moved to the Gemeentearchief Wassenaar due to a collaboration between Wassenaar and Voorschoten.

Sources:

1. Voorschoten, Zuid-Holland, "Burgerlijke Stand geboorte-register" [Civil Registration Birth Register], 1900, no. 25, "Hendrik" son of Lodewijk Wesselo and his wife Elisabeth Lubach; Regionaal Archief Leiden, Leiden, Zuid-Holland; digital image, "Zoek op personen," Regionaal Archief Leiden, Regionaal Archief Leiden Home (http://www.archiefleiden.nl/home/collecties/personen/zoek-op-personen : accessed 22 December 2012). Searchterm used: Lodewijk Wesselo.
2. Voorschoten, Zuid-Holland, "Burgerlijke Stand overlijdens-register" [Civil Registration Death Register], 1900, no. 12, “Hendrik Wesselo” son of Lodewijk Wesselo and Elisabeth Lubach; Regionaal Archief Leiden, Leiden, Zuid-Holland; digital image, "Zoek op personen," Regionaal Archief Leiden, Regionaal Archief Leiden Home (http://www.archiefleiden.nl/home/collecties/personen/zoek-op-personen : accessed 22 December 2012). Searchterm used: Lodewijk Wesselo.
3. Antje Wesselo (Rotterdam, Zuid-Holland) to “Oom Bram” [Abraham Bernardus Wesselo], letter, 14 March 1944; portfolio 1, doos 1, familiearchief Wesselo; familiearchieven: Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie, fa 00472; Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie (CBG), Den Haag, Zuid-Holland.
4. Voorschoten, Zuid-Holland, "Burgerlijke Stand overlijdens-register" [Civil Registration Death Register], 1901, no. 16, “child of the male sex” son of Lodewijk Wesselo and Elisabeth Lubach, stillborn; Regionaal Archief Leiden, Leiden, Zuid-Holland; digital image, "Zoek op personen," Regionaal Archief Leiden, Regionaal Archief Leiden Home (http://www.archiefleiden.nl/home/collecties/personen/zoek-op-personen : accessed 22 December 2012). Searchterm used: Lodewijk Wesselo.
5. Antje Wesselo (Rotterdam, Zuid-Holland) to “Oom Bram” [Abraham Bernardus Wesselo], letter, 14 March 1944; portfolio 1, doos 1, familiearchief Wesselo; familiearchieven: Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie, fa 00472; Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie (CBG), Den Haag, Zuid-Holland.
6. Voorschoten, Zuid-Holland, "Burgerlijke Stand geboorte-register" [Civil Registration Birth Register], 1902, no. 25, "Antje" daughter of Lodewijk Wesselo and his wife Elisabeth Lubach; Regionaal Archief Leiden, Leiden, Zuid-Holland; digital image, "Zoek op personen," Regionaal Archief Leiden, Regionaal Archief Leiden Home (http://www.archiefleiden.nl/home/collecties/personen/zoek-op-personen : accessed 22 December 2012). Searchterm used: Lodewijk Wesselo.
7. Antje Wesselo (Rotterdam, Zuid-Holland) to “Oom Bram” [Abraham Bernardus Wesselo], letter, 14 March 1944; portfolio 1, doos 1, familiearchief Wesselo; familiearchieven: Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie, fa 00472; Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie (CBG), Den Haag, Zuid-Holland.
8. Lodewijk Wesselo, Brief Biographical Sketch, manuscript, 1947; portfolio 3, doos 1, familiearchief Wesselo, familiearchieven: Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie, fa 00472, Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie, Den Haag, Zuid-Holland.
9. Lodewijk Wesselo, Brief Biographical Sketch, manuscript, 1947; portfolio 3, doos 1, familiearchief Wesselo, familiearchieven: Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie, fa 00472, Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie, Den Haag, Zuid-Holland.
10. Lodewijk Wesselo, Brief Biographical Sketch, manuscript, 1947; portfolio 3, doos 1, familiearchief Wesselo, familiearchieven: Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie, fa 00472, Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie, Den Haag, Zuid-Holland.
11. Carolus Pictor, "Een diamanten tijd in dienst van goud, zilver en diamanten: De Heer L. Wesselo 60 jaar chef bij Begeer, van Kempen & Vos" [A Diamond Time in Service of Gold, Silver and Diamonds: Mister L. Wesselo 60 Years Boss at Begeer, van Kempen & Vos], Edelmetaal , July 1948, 107, copy; portfolio 3, doos 1, familiearchief Wesselo, familiearchieven: Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie, fa 00472, Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie, Den Haag, Zuid-Holland.
12. Carolus Pictor, "Een diamanten tijd in dienst van goud, zilver en diamanten: De Heer L. Wesselo 60 jaar chef bij Begeer, van Kempen & Vos" [A Diamond Time in Service of Gold, Silver and Diamonds: Mister L. Wesselo 60 Years Boss at Begeer, van Kempen & Vos], Edelmetaal , July 1948, 107, copy; portfolio 3, doos 1, familiearchief Wesselo, familiearchieven: Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie, fa 00472, Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie, Den Haag, Zuid-Holland.
13. Lodewijk Wesselo, Brief Biographical Sketch, manuscript, 1947; portfolio 3, doos 1, familiearchief Wesselo, familiearchieven: Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie, fa 00472, Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie, Den Haag, Zuid-Holland.
14. Carolus Pictor, "Een diamanten tijd in dienst van goud, zilver en diamanten: De Heer L. Wesselo 60 jaar chef bij Begeer, van Kempen & Vos" [A Diamond Time in Service of Gold, Silver and Diamonds: Mister L. Wesselo 60 Years Boss at Begeer, van Kempen & Vos], Edelmetaal , July 1948, 107, copy; portfolio 3, doos 1, familiearchief Wesselo, familiearchieven: Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie, fa 00472, Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie, Den Haag, Zuid-Holland.
15. Lodewijk Wesselo, Brief Biographical Sketch, manuscript, 1947; portfolio 3, doos 1, familiearchief Wesselo, familiearchieven: Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie, fa 00472, Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie, Den Haag, Zuid-Holland.
16. Carolus Pictor, "Een diamanten tijd in dienst van goud, zilver en diamanten: De Heer L. Wesselo 60 jaar chef bij Begeer, van Kempen & Vos" [A Diamond Time in Service of Gold, Silver and Diamonds: Mister L. Wesselo 60 Years Boss at Begeer, van Kempen & Vos], Edelmetaal , July 1948, 107, copy; portfolio 3, doos 1, familiearchief Wesselo, familiearchieven: Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie, fa 00472, Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie, Den Haag, Zuid-Holland.
17. Lodewijk Wesselo, Brief Biographical Sketch, manuscript, 1947; portfolio 3, doos 1, familiearchief Wesselo, familiearchieven: Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie, fa 00472, Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie, Den Haag, Zuid-Holland.
18. Lodewijk Wesselo, Brief Biographical Sketch, manuscript, 1947; portfolio 3, doos 1, familiearchief Wesselo, familiearchieven: Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie, fa 00472, Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie, Den Haag, Zuid-Holland.
19. Carolus Pictor, "Een diamanten tijd in dienst van goud, zilver en diamanten: De Heer L. Wesselo 60 jaar chef bij Begeer, van Kempen & Vos" [A Diamond Time in Service of Gold, Silver and Diamonds: Mister L. Wesselo 60 Years Boss at Begeer, van Kempen & Vos], Edelmetaal , July 1948, 107, copy; portfolio 3, doos 1, familiearchief Wesselo, familiearchieven: Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie, fa 00472, Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie, Den Haag, Zuid-Holland.
20. Lodewijk Wesselo, Brief Biographical Sketch, manuscript, 1947; portfolio 3, doos 1, familiearchief Wesselo, familiearchieven: Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie, fa 00472, Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie, Den Haag, Zuid-Holland.
21. Lodewijk Wesselo, Brief Biographical Sketch, manuscript, 1947; portfolio 3, doos 1, familiearchief Wesselo, familiearchieven: Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie, fa 00472, Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie, Den Haag, Zuid-Holland.
22. Carolus Pictor, "Een diamanten tijd in dienst van goud, zilver en diamanten: De Heer L. Wesselo 60 jaar chef bij Begeer, van Kempen & Vos" [A Diamond Time in Service of Gold, Silver and Diamonds: Mister L. Wesselo 60 Years Boss at Begeer, van Kempen & Vos], Edelmetaal , July 1948, 107, copy; portfolio 3, doos 1, familiearchief Wesselo, familiearchieven: Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie, fa 00472, Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie, Den Haag, Zuid-Holland.
23. Carolus Pictor, "Een diamanten tijd in dienst van goud, zilver en diamanten: De Heer L. Wesselo 60 jaar chef bij Begeer, van Kempen & Vos" [A Diamond Time in Service of Gold, Silver and Diamonds: Mister L. Wesselo 60 Years Boss at Begeer, van Kempen & Vos], Edelmetaal , July 1948, 107, copy; portfolio 3, doos 1, familiearchief Wesselo, familiearchieven: Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie, fa 00472, Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie, Den Haag, Zuid-Holland.

Monday, June 15, 2015

Write it Down: The Art of Keeping a Research Log

Writing stuff down is so very important. Yet it so often was an afterthought for me. Sure, when I was in an archive I wrote down what I've found (or not found) and where. And I even tried to include all the information I needed to make my source citations since reading Evidence Explained by Elizabeth Shown Mills. But when it came to a quick, 15-minute search online - which often ends up being an hour or two when I get going - I tended to forget to write things down. Which meant I often had to repeat my work...a waste of time and effort.

And while we're on the topic of writing things down, I've found some of my old notes recently that I hadn't processed yet. I usually try to digitize my notes as soon as possible after an archive visit. Nowadays, it's not such a big problem if I don't because I have a system. But those old notes... I wrote things down, but not always the same way. I didn't really have a system and that meant I had to decipher my notes if I didn't process them immediately.

But these days I use a system. It's a pretty basic system called a research log. You can keep a really basic one - as explained in the FamilySearch 5 Minute Genealogy Episode 12: Write It Down. Doing just that much is great start. Personally, I like the two part lecture on research logs from G. David Dilts A.G. - Part 1 & Part 2 - and I like his system too. I use it and it works great to keep me on track even if I have longer periods of time in which I don't have the time to research my ancestors.

I highly recommend keeping some sort of research log. It doesn't matter how you write it down, as long as you do. Trust me, you'll be glad you did!

Friday, June 12, 2015

Digital Filing

Digital filing is just as important as paper filing, but it’s also much easier to forget to do it. Search functions on the computer help when you can’t find a document, while there are no paper stacks almost toppling over to spur you into a cleaning and filing spree. But without proper digital filing you don’t only lose time looking for a file, you might also repeat work you’ve already done or miss information because you didn’t know you had it!

So we’ve established digital filing is important, but how do you do it? Well, personally, I’m a fan of the KISS principle – Keep It Simple, Stupid. I didn’t start out that way. I over-filed my digital files, having too many subfolders in subfolders in folders. This was fine in the beginning, when I didn’t have so much digital files, but soon it grew to ridiculous proportions. Which led to me dumping files in a temporary folder “to file later”, which as we all know usually means it doesn’t get done at all. And the numerous subfolders also prevented me from seeing what I did and didn’t have at a glance. So the system needs to go in favor of a simpler one.

In my post from last Monday, I talked about my new paper filing system. The book I mentioned in that post, How to Archive Family Keepsakes by Denise May Levenick, has a lot of information about digital files and filing as well. I decided to keep it simple and mirror my physical filing system. That means one folder per family, unmarried people remaining with their parents. The naming of the files will be uniform: surname-first-names_YYYYMMDD_country-province-place_type-of-document. So, for instance, Lodewijk Wesselo’s birth certificate is named wesselo-lodewijk_18751222_ned-zh-voorschoten_geboorteakte.

I’ve only just started implementing this and it’s going to be a big job. But I want to process all the digital files I already have before starting to make more digital files by digitizing my archive. So I’m taking a few hours a week to really sit down and go through my files, renaming them and putting them in new, correct (and fewer!) folders.

Digital filing takes some time, but the results are worth it!

Organizing my digital files ties in with another digital project I’ve started just this week. I’m starting from ‘scratch’ in entering information into my genealogical program. I’ll talk about it in more detail in a separate blog post next week, but after renaming all the files I am also reviewing them and entering the information into a new family tree. In the family tree I can share a fact – like a birth – with all the people mentioned in the source, like witnesses. It’s not necessary for a birth certificate to be in the folder of the witness. However, if I have, say, a record that shows two brothers and their families living together, it’s a primary source for two family heads. I would want that record in the folder of the first brother, but also of the second brother. This is easy with digital files, and I would simply rename the copy. It would look something like this: brother-one_19001015_ned-zh-leiden_housing-record, and the copy would then be: brother-two_19001015_ned-zh-leiden_housing-record. That way, all the information is with the right families, so if I’m working on brother two’s family, I would not forget that housing record because it’s only in brother one’s folder. In my genealogy program, I could enter it as two separate facts with a note that the brother was living there too, or as a shared fact. I haven’t encountered it yet, so I’m not entirely sure what I’ll do, but I’m leaning towards separate facts because if the dates they move to a different address are different, then a shared fact wouldn’t work.

This system still needs to be tested, but I’m confident it will work well. At the very least, it’ll be easier to maintain then my previous, overly-complicated scheme!

photo credit: Tha Work via photopin (license)

Wednesday, June 10, 2015

Soli Deo Gloria: A Biography of Lodewijk Wesselo - Part 1: Introduction & In the Beginning


Introduction

“You cannot imagine the atmosphere of those days, the street was dug up in no time and shots were resounding, rest was not an option, nowhere was it safe for us, eventually we had fortified ourselves as best we could behind the sliding door of the storage room and the green stairs, … 3 nights and 4 days we were there feeling the greatest turmoil, even connection with the neighbors was out of the question, every movement outside the door drew bullets. De conditions soon became worse, the bombs were hitting right and left, and the house was shaking. Soon we had no water any more, were cold and tired. All of us were dressed completely, E[lisabeth] in her winter coat, Ant and I in a rain coat, we thought it was a waste to wear our good clothes! The day after Pentecost the situation reached an all-time low, so then we said goodbye to each other and didn’t know any better or we would be finished soon, we read psalm 23 by the light of a torch gave Grace and prayed to God. The house was shaking, but danger kept passing us by, ... .” (1)

Words written by Lodewijk Wesselo in a letter to his brother Willem and his wife, in which he tells of the bombardment of Rotterdam in May 1940 by German forces invading the Netherlands. By this time, Lodewijk had already lived through his share of ups and down. During his life, he kept his faith throughout two world wars and one of the greatest floods the Netherlands has ever seen. He also experienced tragedy on a more personal scale, but his character and faith have helped him stand strong no matter how fierce the storm. His life’s story, not even close to the end when the bombs were falling, starts many years earlier, back in 1875.

In the Beginning

Lodewijk, affectionately known as Lo, was born on 22 December 1875 in Voorschoten to Hendrik Wesselo and Alida Petronella van Grasstek.(2) As was customary in those times, he started working at an early age. He finished his primary schooling when he was twelve and immediately after that he started working as an apprentice goldsmith on 23 July 1888 at ‘Van Kempen en Zoon’ in Voorschoten.(3) For five years he was an apprentice goldsmith, starting out with polishing, sawing and filing things. In the first year he earned two guilders a week, although in his own words “the kind of work you did, didn’t really deserve that kind of pay.”(4) Every year of his apprenticeship the weekly pay increased by twenty cents, so at the end of the five year period he was earning three guilders a week.(5)

1. Silver factory in Voorschoten, around 1900. started working here in 1888 as a goldsmith.

If you were a good apprentice, you became a journeyman. Lodewijk must have been a good apprentice, because he was made a journeyman at the end of his apprenticeship, when he was eighteen years old.(6) He started out with six cents as his hourly wage, a very decent pay for a journeyman in that time. Work was about ten hours a day and usually a couple of nights as well. At the end of the nineteenth century, working several nights was common. Lodewijk himself had this to say about it: “As a worker you wanted to. But you weren’t paid any extra. Just your regular wage.”(7)

Once he was working without needing supervision, he managed to sometimes earn up to two guilders per week extra by fixing clocks and watches.(8) It was during this time in his life that he fell in love with Elisabeth Lubach, affectionately known as “Liesbeth”, who was born on 31 October 1873 in Voorschoten to Dirk Lubach and Antje Zilstra.(9) Absolved from military service, he got engaged with Elisabeth when he was twenty years old.(10, 11)

Living frugally and saving his money enabled him to buy two hundred square meters of land, situation in the former estate “Klein Langehorst” in Voorschoten, on 5 August 1898 from Johannes Pieter Schmal, with his father acting in his stead since Lodewijk himself is still considered a minor.(12) On 1 April of the next year, his uncle Jan Hendrik Ruskamp loaned him two-thousand five-hundred guilder against a favorable rate to build a house.(13) That same year, Lodewijk married Elisabeth. The marriage was held on 13 July 1899 in Voorschoten, and Lodewijk himself describes the marriage with “and he was happy, also with his own home” in a chronology of his own life forty-eight years later.(14, 15) The couple moved into the house Lodewijk built to start their lives together.(16)




Note:

Please note that there are several differences between this English, on-line version and the Dutch PDF/printed version. All sources of this English version are in full, whereas in the Dutch version for repeated use of the same source the short version of the footnote was used. This digital version will also have fewer pictures, because several pictures I used in the Dutch version are not allowed to be placed on-line, by request of the copyright holder. Where the Dutch version contains transcriptions of Lodewijk Wesselo's own written words, the English version contains translations of these words. Both transcriptions and translations were done by me.

Note about sources of the archive of Voorschoten:

While I was doing the research for this biography the archive of Voorschoten was located at the Regionaal Archief Leiden. Since then, the archive has been moved to the Gemeentearchief Wassenaar due to a collaboration between Wassenaar and Voorschoten.

Sources:

1. Lodewijk Wesselo (Rotterdam, Zuid-Holland) to “Willem en Mien” [Willem Lodewijk Wesselo and his wife Wilhelmina Johanna Kwak], letter, 10 September 1940; portfolio 3, doos 1, familiearchief Wesselo; familiearchieven: Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie, fa 00472; Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie (CBG), Den Haag, Zuid-Holland.
2. Voorschoten, Zuid-Holland, "Burgerlijke Stand geboorte-register" [Civil Registration Birth Register], 1875, no. 85, "Lodewijk" son of Hendrik Wesselo and his wife Alida Petronella van Grasstek; Regionaal Archief Leiden, Leiden, Zuid-Holland; digital image, "Zoek op personen," Regionaal Archief Leiden, Regionaal Archief Leiden Home (http://www.archiefleiden.nl/home/collecties/personen/zoek-op-personen : accessed 22 December 2012). Searchterm used: Lodewijk Wesselo. Archive has since moved to Gemeentearchief Wassenaar.
3. Lodewijk Wesselo, Brief Biographical Sketch, manuscript, 1947; portfolio 3, doos 1, familiearchief Wesselo, familiearchieven: Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie, fa 00472, Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie, Den Haag, Zuid-Holland.
4. Lodewijk Wesselo, Brief Biographical Sketch, manuscript, 1947; portfolio 3, doos 1, familiearchief Wesselo, familiearchieven: Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie, fa 00472, Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie, Den Haag, Zuid-Holland.
5. Carolus Pictor, "Een diamanten tijd in dienst van goud, zilver en diamanten: De Heer L. Wesselo 60 jaar chef bij Begeer, van Kempen & Vos" [A Diamond Time in Service of Gold, Silver and Diamonds: Mister L. Wesselo 60 Years Boss at Begeer, van Kempen & Vos], Edelmetaal , July 1948, 107, copy; portfolio 3, doos 1, familiearchief Wesselo, familiearchieven: Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie, fa 00472, Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie, Den Haag, Zuid-Holland.
6. Lodewijk Wesselo, Brief Biographical Sketch, manuscript, 1947; portfolio 3, doos 1, familiearchief Wesselo, familiearchieven: Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie, fa 00472, Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie, Den Haag, Zuid-Holland.
7. Carolus Pictor, "Een diamanten tijd in dienst van goud, zilver en diamanten: De Heer L. Wesselo 60 jaar chef bij Begeer, van Kempen & Vos" [A Diamond Time in Service of Gold, Silver and Diamonds: Mister L. Wesselo 60 Years Boss at Begeer, van Kempen & Vos], Edelmetaal , July 1948, 107, copy; portfolio 3, doos 1, familiearchief Wesselo, familiearchieven: Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie, fa 00472, Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie, Den Haag, Zuid-Holland.
8. Lodewijk Wesselo, Brief Biographical Sketch, manuscript, 1947; portfolio 3, doos 1, familiearchief Wesselo, familiearchieven: Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie, fa 00472, Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie, Den Haag, Zuid-Holland.
9. Voorschoten, Zuid-Holland, "Burgerlijke Stand geboorte-register" [Civil Registration Birth Register], 1873, no. 57, "Elisabeth" daughter of Dirk Lubach and his wife Antje Zilstra; Regionaal Archief Leiden, Leiden, Zuid-Holland; digital image, "Zoek op personen," Regionaal Archief Leiden, Regionaal Archief Leiden Home (http://www.archiefleiden.nl/home/collecties/personen/zoek-op-personen : accessed 22 December 2012). Searchterm used: Elisabeth Lubach.
10. Militieregisters Zuid-Holland [Militia Registers Zuid-Holland], 1881-1941, inventarisnummer 394, nummer toegang 3.02.25, entry “Lodewijk Wesselo” under the town Voorschoten; Nationaal Archief, Den Haag, Zuid-Holland.
11. Lodewijk Wesselo, Brief Biographical Sketch, manuscript, 1947; portfolio 3, doos 1, familiearchief Wesselo, familiearchieven: Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie, fa 00472, Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie, Den Haag, Zuid-Holland.
12. Transport akte van Johannes Pieter Schmal ten behoeve van Hendrik Wesselo als vader van zijn minderjarige zoon Lodewijk Wesselo [Land deed of Johannes Pieter Schmal to Hendrik Wesselo, acting for his minor son Lodewijk Wesselo], 5 augustus 1898 (registered 6 augustus 1898). Minuten van akten 1898, inventarisnummer 4, nummer toegang 739B, Notariele archieven Voorschoten, Regionaal Archief Leiden, Leiden, Zuid-Holland.
13. Hypotheek akte van Lodewijk Wesselo ten behoeve van Jan Hendrik Ruskamp [Morgage agreement between Lodewijk Wesselo and Jan Hendrik Ruskamp], 1 april 1899 (registered 8 april 1899). Minuten van akten 1899, inventarisnummer 5, nummer toegang 739B, Notariele archieven Voorschoten, Regionaal Archief Leiden, Leiden, Zuid-Holland.
14. Voorschoten, Zuid-Holland, "Burgerlijke Stand huwelijks-register" [Civil Registration Marriage Register], 1899, no. 11, Lodewijk Wesselo and Elisabeth Lubach; Regionaal Archief Leiden, Leiden, Zuid-Holland; digital image, "Zoek op personen," Regionaal Archief Leiden, Regionaal Archief Leiden Home (http://www.archiefleiden.nl/home/collecties/personen/zoek-op-personen : accessed 22 December 2012). Searchterm used: Elisabeth Lubach.
15. Lodewijk Wesselo, Brief Biographical Sketch, manuscript, 1947; portfolio 3, doos 1, familiearchief Wesselo, familiearchieven: Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie, fa 00472, Centraal Bureau voor Genealogie, Den Haag, Zuid-Holland.
16. Voorschoten, Zuid-Holland, “Register van nieuwe, veranderde of gesloopte gebouwen” [Register of new, changed or demolished buildings], 1885-1915, 7e blad, volgnummer 155; inventarisnummer 510, nummer toegang 731, Dorps- en gemeentebestuur van Voorschoten,Regionaal Archief Leiden, Leiden, Zuid-Holland. Voorschoten, Zuid-Holland, “Register van de Huisnummering der Gemeente Voorschoten” [Register of the House Numbering of the Town Voorschoten], ca. 1895 [as identified by archive, but inclusion of Lodewijk would put the date around 1900], unnumbered p. 3; inventarisnummer 555, nummer toegang 731, Dorps- en gemeentebestuur van Voorschoten,Regionaal Archief Leiden, Leiden, Zuid-Holland.

Picture source:

1. Postcard, owned by J.M.