Tuesday, June 29, 2010

The Dutch National Football Team

First Match

The Dutch National Football Team played their first international match on 30 April 1905 against our southern neighbor Belgium. At the end of the official playing time the score was 1-1, but in the extra time three more goals were made by Eddy de Neve, causing the Netherlands to win with 4-1.


1. First national team of the Netherlands


Greatest Results

The greatest accomplishment to date was winning the European Championship in 1988 which was held in West-Germany. The final was played against the Sovjet-Union. Only two goals were made, both by the Netherlands.

My aunt F. and uncle G. were here during that match. Uncle G. is an Australian and they both live in Australia. My father tells me that during the match the streets were silent, no cars passed, no people, nothing. The entire country was watching the match. When the end signal was given and we were the champion everyone streamed out into the streets, cheering, honking the horns of their cars. My uncle was amazed at the joy of the people, all decked out in orange. I’m sure it must’ve been an amazing, if slightly weird, sight.

When it comes to World Cups, we’re not so lucky. Twice we made the finals, in 1974 and again in 1978, but both times we lost. Once from West-Germany and once from Argentina.

The Color Orange

The Netherlands national football team play in a bright orange shirt. Orange is the historic national color of the Netherlands, originating from the coat of arms of the Dutch founding father William of Orange-Nassau. The top red band of the current flag was originally orange. The current Dutch away shirt is white, with two thin lines outlining a chevron containing the colors of the Dutch flag. Occasionally, orange socks are worn instead of light blue socks, such as in the qualifier against Scotland on March 28, 2009. (1) It’s not strange then, that one of the nicknames of the team is Oranje; the Dutch word for Orange.


2. Dutch supporters during the World Cup 2006


World Cup 2010

In the group stage of this World Cup we won all three matches, against Denmark, Japan and Cameroon; in that order. We only got one goals against us, originating from a penalty. In the first match of the knock-out stage, we played Slovakia. We won, meaning we are now through to the quarter-finals. They’re being played this Friday against Brazil.
Brazil is a dangerous opponent and we can only hope and pray that we’ll win…


Sources:

1. Wikipedia entry Dutch National Football Team

Photo credits:

2. Dan Kamminga, Haarlem, The Netherlands. Taken from the Wikipedia Commons

Monday, June 28, 2010

Amenuensis Monday: Lodewijk Wesselo and Elizabeth Lubach

I'm joining in Amenuensis Monday, the weekly blogging theme hosted by John Newark of Transylvanian Dutch Genealogy. I will transcribe and translate documents, the transcriptions will go directly into my genealogy database and the translations will be posted here. The translations will be in modern language with modern spelling, as it's hard enough to translate already!

My current project is the Wesselo family documents of the generations I am researching this year. I'm starting with Lodewijk Wesselo, the eldest son of the second marriage of Hendrik Wesselo, and his wife Elisabeth Lubach.


Today: the marriage certificate of Lodewijk and Elisabeth. Italics are handwritten, the rest is printed.

In the year eighteen hundred ninety-nine on the thirteenth of the month July appeared before us, civil servant of the municipal registry of Voorschoten in city hall, to be wedded before the law: Lodewijk Wesselo old twenty-three years, with the profession of goldsmith, born and living here, of age son of Hendrik Wesselo, silversmith, and of Alida Petronella van Grasstek, without profession, both living here and Elisabeth Lubach old twenty-five years, with the profession none, born and living here, of age daughter of Dirk Lubach, silversmith, and of Antje Zilstra, without profession, both living here.
By the appearers have been submitted the abstracts of their birth certificates and the prove of compliance with the national militia law of the male apearer.
The parents of the appearers here present state that they give their permission for this marriage.


Given the fact that there were no impediments to the execution of this marriage brought to our knowledge and the marriage bans were called in this town on Sundays the second and the ninth of July without objections, have we asked the appearers in public if they will take each other as spouses and faithfully honor the duties attached to the married state by law. After these questions were answered affirmative by both, is by us declared in the name their law, that they were married.

Of which this certificate was made in the presence of:
Johannes Wesselo, old thirty-four years, of profession teacher, living in Lisse;
Willem Lodewijk van Grasstek, old forthy years, of profession [illegible], living here;
Rienk Lubach, old thirty-five years, of profession engraver, living in Leiden;
Bertus Lubach, old twenty-seven years, of profession foreman, living here;
The first being the brother and the second witness being the uncle of the male appearer and the third and fourth witness being brothers of the female appearer.

After reading aloud this certificate it was signed by us, the appearers, the parents of the appearers and the witnesses, after approval of the crossing out of a letter.

Notes:
1. The national militia law was passed in 1817, stating that one in every hundred citizens was to serve in the armed forces.
2. The crossing out of a letter was at the end of the Grasstek name.

Source:
1. Huwelijksakte Lodewijk Wesselo en Elisabeth Lubach, (13 July 1899), BS Voorschoten Huwelijksakten: Akte Jaar 1899 Nummer 11; Digitale Stamboom Regionaal Archief Leiden, Leiden, Zuid-Holland.

Sunday, June 27, 2010

Sentimental Sunday: Dog Days...

In 1994 my parents brought home a dog; Blacky. He was one and a half years old, a crossbreed between a black labrador and a German Shepperd. Within moments I, seven years old then, was playing with him in our garden with an old tennis ball. With this proof that he was good with kids, the decision was made by my parents to keep him.

But even that day, we got the suspicion he hadn't been treated very well in his old home. He would startle badly if you touched him when he didn't see it coming and he was deadly afraid of water, so we think he was punished by being hosed down with cold water. Not to mention his fear of abandoment. All of this, except his fear of water, got better with time, but that didn't help us in the beginning.

The day after we got Blacky, we were going to visit my uncle T. and his family in Noord-Brabant, which was a good two hour drive. We would stay there all day and then go back. We decided to take Blacky, as we didn't want to leave him alone all day just yet. So, in the car he went, grudginly, I might add.

What the poor dog must've been thinking we'll never know, but I can make an educated guess. He was terrified and probably thought we were going to bring him back to his first home. He stuck like glue to my father all day. My father moved one step left, Blacky moved one step left. It would've been funny if it hadn't been so sad.




But, as with all things, once he started trusting us, it got better. And then his mischievous side emerged. He did things like stealing the cake of a plate with all kinds of snacks. Just the cake, mind you, he'd carefully nosed the other treats aside!

Also, one time a little piece of raisin bread was left over. My Mom had placed it, wrapped in a plastic sandwich bag, on a low shelf in the kitchen. We placed stuff there all the time, and never had any problems. That evening, my mother asked my father why he couldn't have thrown the wrapping away if he ate the last piece of bread. While she was berating him, Blacky very slowly snuck out of the room. Well, nobody had to ask who the real perp was!



Christmas 2005 was the beginning of the end. He stood up and swaggered, almost falling several times. It was like he'd had a stroke. He was still a bit sick the next day, but soon after he was better. Age had made him slow, but he was twelve by then, quite old for a dog.

Everything seemed to be fine, until May 2006. My final exams were just finished when the trouble started. He kept throwing up and hardly ate. He was truly as sick as a dog and my parents took him to the vet. The verdict was that there was something wrong with his kidneys and that the best thing to do was euthanase him. The last day, we fed him everything he liked, like cheese and liver and french fries. He threw it all up, but at least he ate something. I said goodbye at home and then my parents took him to the vet.

Sometimes I still miss him, but I can honestly say I do not miss going out in the rain for a walk! He was a good friend, a good companion and he gave me many years of joy. I never would've wanted to miss it for the world.

Saturday, June 26, 2010

Family Sheet Lodewijk Wesselo

Lodewijk Wesselo, born 22 December 1875 in Voorschoten, died 18 February 1962 in Rotterdam

Married Elisbeth Lubach, born 31 October 1873 in Voorschoten, died 12 February 1952 in Rotterdam, on 13 July 1899 in Voorschoten.

Children from this marriage:

1. Hendrik Wesselo, born 21 April 1900 in Voorschoten, died 28 april 1900 in Voorschoten, 7 days old.
2. NN Wesselo, born and died 8 October 1901 in Voorschoten. Stillborn.
3. Antje Wesselo, born 1 November 1902 in Voorschoten, died 19 October 1986 in Rotterdam, 83 years old.


Posts about Lodewijk Wesselo:

Amenuensis Monday: Lodewijk Wesselo and Elizabeth Lubach (birth certificates)
Amenuensis Monday: Lodewijk Wesselo and Elizabeth Lubach (marriage certificate)
Amenuensis Monday: Letters From Lodewijk Wesselo

Amanuensis Monday: Deed of Sale for a Plot of Land

Amanuensis Monday: Lodewijk Wesselo’s Mortgage Agreement

Indirect Evidence for an Illness

My Very First Piece of Conflicting Evidence – and the Resolution

An Ancestor’s Thoughts About Genealogy

 Amanuensis Monday: Lodewijk Wesselo as an Expert Witness (1)

 Amanuensis Monday: Lodewijk Wesselo as an Expert Witness (2)


Posts about Lodewijk & Elisabeth's children:

Amenuensis Monday: Children Lodewijk Wesselo and Elizabeth Lubach

Family Sheet Hendrik Wesselo

Hendrik Wesselo born 18 August 1840, Utrecht, died 14 October 1905, Voorschoten

1. Married Anthonia Tulp, born 27 January 1837, Utrecht, died 15 April 1872, Voorschoten, on 18 May 1864 in Utrecht.

Children from this marriage:

a. Johannes (Johan) Wesselo, born 5 February 1865, Voorschoten
b. Gijsbert Anthonie Wesselo, born 12 March 1866, Voorschoten
c. Johanna Wilhelmina (Hans, Jo) Wesselo, born 19 October 1868, Voorschoten
d. Alida Maria Wesselo, born 28 August 1870, Voorschoten

2. Married Alida Petronella van Grasstek, born 13 December 1852, Amsterdam, died 10 March 1925, Voorschoten, on 28 February 1875 in Voorschoten.

Children from this marriage:

e. Lodewijk (Lo) Wesselo, born 22 December 1875 in Voorschoten
f. Jan Jerphaas (Jan) Wesselo, born 19 August 1877 in Voorschoten
g. Wilhelmina Gerredina (Wim) Wesselo, born 19 August 1877 in Voorschoten
h. Jannetje (Jans) Wesselo, born 1 January 1882 in Voorschoten
i. Abraham Bernardus (Bram) Wesselo, born 21 January 1884 in Voorschoten
j. Alida Petronella (Alie) Wesselo, born 6 June 1886 in Voorschoten (#11) (Family Sheet B.C. Bolle)
k. Gerredina Eleonora (Dien) Wesselo, born 17 March 1889 in Voorschoten
l. Willem Lodewijk (Wim) Wesselo, born 3 January 1893 in Voorschoten

Wednesday, June 23, 2010

Wordless Wednesday - Minor Flooding



Minor flooding in front of our house in the fall of 2002, after heavy rain. It didn't damage our house, but it did flood some of the lower lying houses in the street. It took several hours after the rain stopped for the water levels to drop.

Monday, June 21, 2010

Amenuensis Monday: Lodewijk Wesselo and Elizabeth Lubach

I'm joining in Amenuensis Monday, the weekly blogging theme hosted by John Newark of Transylvanian Dutch Genealogy. I will transcribe and translate documents, the transcriptions will go directly into my genealogy database and the translations will be posted here. The translations will be in modern language with modern spelling, as it's hard enough to translate already!

My current project is the Wesselo family documents of the generations I am researching this year. I'm starting with Lodewijk Wesselo, the eldest son of the second marriage of Hendrik Wesselo, and his wife Elisabeth Lubach.


Today: the birth certificates of Lodewijk and Elisabeth. Italics are handwritten, the rest is printed.

Birth Certificate Lodewijk Wesselo:

On the twenty-third of the month December eighteen hundred seventy-five is for us Major civil servant of the municipal registry of Voorschoten in city hall has appeared Hendrik Wesselo silversmith old thirty-five years, living here, who has stated that on the twenty-second this [month] in the morning at half past seven hours, in this town in his own house a child was born of the male sex, from Alida Petronella van Grasstek without profession living in his own house, his wife, which will be named Lodewijk.

Of this statement we have made this certificate, in the presence of Lodewijk van Grasstek, silversmith old fifty-eight years, living here and of Abraham Bernardus van Grasstek, traveler, old twenty-seven years, living here and is thus, after reading it out loud, signed by us, the appearer and the witnesses.

Notes:
1. The major was Jacob Petrus Treub, he was the major of Voorschoten from 1841 until his death in 1887.
2. Lodewijk van Grasstek is the father of Alida Petronella
3. Abraham Bernardus van Grasstek is the brother of Alida Petronella

Birth Certificate Elisabeth Lubach

On the first of the month November eighteen hundred seventy-three is for us Major civil servant of the municipal registry of Voorschoten in city hall has appeared Dirk Lubach, silversmith old thirty-three years, living here, who has stated that on the thirty-first of the last month in the late afternoon at half past four hours, in this town in his own house a child was born of the female sex, from Antje Zilstra without profession living in his own house, his wife, which will be named Elisabeth.

Of this statement we have made this certificate, in the presence of Hendrik Munsterman, goldsmith old twenty-four years, living here and of Hendrik Christiaan Yperlaan, silversmith, old twenty-eight years, living here and is thus, after reading it out loud, signed by us, the appearer and the witnesses.

Notes:
1. The major was Jacob Petrus Treub, he was the major of Voorschoten from 1841 until his death in 1887.
2. The witnesses are probably co-workers of Dirk Lubach, given their professions.


Sources:

1. Lodewijk Wesselo entry, Geboorteakte, BS Voorschoten: Akte Jaar 1875 Nummer 83, Digitale Stamboom Regionaal Archief Leiden, Leiden, Zuid-Holland.
2. Elisabeth Lubach entry, BS Voorschoten Geboorteaktes, Akte Jaar 1873: Nummer 57, Digitale Stamboom Regionaal Archief Leiden, Leiden, Zuid-Holland.

Sunday, June 20, 2010

Immigration Speculation

When looking at ancestors who have immigrated, it’s good to realize that there are always reasons. Nobody ever packs up his entire live to go and live in a different country ‘just because’. Sometimes, it’s because they moved away from something, like bad economic circumstances, persecution or famine. Other times, it’s because they moved towards something, like a new job, new opportunities or freedom. Most of the times, it’s a combination of the two.

It’s rare that we can ask the ancestors who moved to a new country why they did so. Sometimes they are still alive to ask, sometimes they left documents that state those reasons. But most of the times, we can only speculate. And maybe we come close to the real reason when we do this.

My grandfather Adolph Knura was born in Bottrop, Nordrhein-Westfalen, Germany. Nordrhein-Westfalen borders the Netherlands in the east and Bottrop is right in the middle of the highly industrial Rurh-area. My grandfather was born in 1914 and left Bottrop in 1932. He moved to Voorschoten, Zuid-Holland, the Netherlands, all the way in the west. Today I take a look at the reasons he might’ve had to move away from Bottrop and the reasons he might’ve had to move to Voorschoten.

Away from Bottrop

The Great Depression begins in Oktober 1929 in the US, but quickly spreads across the world. In Europe, Germany and Austria are hit particularly hard because they have huge loans after World War I, due to having to pay damages. In March 1931, France demands all loans be payed back immediately, which causes the complete collapse of German industry. When 1932 begins, there are around six million people unemployed. In Bottrop, the economic crisis is also felt. One of the mines closed in 1930, causing a lot of people to become unemployed.
My grandfather might’ve had trouble finding a job, causing him to move in search of employment.

Another cause might be found in the mining industry. Bottrop and the surrounding area relied heavily on the mining industry to provide jobs. In fact, my grandfather’s father and brothers were miners. But mining is very dangerous. Chronic lung diseases such as black lung were very common in miners in those days, leading to a reduced life expectancy. The mining itself also brought many dangers, like suffocation, gas poisoning, roof collapse and gas explosions.
According to my mother, my grandfather was very opposed to going to work in the mines. So this likely influenced his decision to move away from Bottrop.

The last reason he might’ve had to move away from Bottrop can be found in the politics of the time. In the beginning of 1932 a new government was elected, but the military refused to support the government, causing new elections to be written. It was these new elections, in July 1932, in which Hitler’s party became the leading party.
My grandfather left in February/March of 1932 and the political unrest of those days, perhaps with a bit of foreshadowing of what was to come, could’ve contributed to his decision to move.

So, in summary, the move away from Bottrop was most likely economical in motivation. My grandfather didn’t want to work in the mines and with the Great Depression, there were few other jobs in the area. The political unrest of the time might’ve been the final push to leave.

Towards Voorschoten

Now that we know why Adolph moved away from Bottrop, it’s good to take a look as to why he moved to Voorschoten. He did not stop anywhere along the way, he came directly to Voorschoten, clear across the country from where he entered it.

There’s a very good reason for that, and she goes by the name of Anna Knura; Adolph’s older sister. She was already living in Voorschoten and was married to Lambertus van Aken, who owned his own painting company. Adolph moved in with her for the first few months he was in Voorschoten and went to work as a painter in Lambertus’ company.
So, he came to Voorschoten knowing he had family here, a roof over his head for as long as he needed it, and a good prospect (if not a certainty) of a job.

Where there more reasons for this move? Perhaps.
Am I right in every reason I just mentioned? Very likely.
Will we ever know for sure? No.
Still, it’s a valuable exercise, as it colors in the events surrounding one of the most important decisions in Adolph Knura’s life.


Sources:
1. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coal_mining#Dangers_to_miners
2. Bingham, J., Chandler, F & Taplin, s. The Usborne Internet-Linked Encyclopedia of World History. 2008.
3. Reader's Digest. Mijlpalen van de 20e eeuw. Amsterdam: The Reader's Digest, around 1980.

Saturday, June 19, 2010

Knura Connection Or Not?

When I was at the Central Bureau for Genealogy on April third of this year, I found a genealogy statement made during the German occupation. All police officers and several other civil servants were required to fill in a form stating their parents and grandparents, as well as their partners parents and grandparents, to prove they were not Jewish. In one such document, I found a possible connection to my grandfather Adolph Knura.

This particula document was the genealogy statement of Willem Frederik Hendrik Hendriks, whose wife is Augusta Martha Knura. Now here's where it gets interesting. Augusta was born in Bottrop, Germany on 17 April 1905, is Roman-Catholic and her parents are listed as Anton Knura, miner, deceased in Bottrop on 18 December 1914 and Victoria Durczak, deceased in Bottrop on 23 February 1941.

It seems to me that it is very, very coincidental that there is another Knura who's a miner in Bottrop without it being family of Bergmann Josef Knura, the father of Adolph, who was also a miner. Now here's the catch: I do not know the birth place or date of Bergmann, but I do know the birth place and date of Anton Knura! If they are indeed related, I can search for Bergmann Josef Knura in Anton's birth place and see if I find anything.

I know it's not much, and I'm not going to follow up on it for now, as there are easier ways to find out more about Bergmann Josef Knura. But if I hit a brick wall, I will certainly keep this in mind and if Bergmann and Anton do end up sharing the same birth place, I will look for the connection between the two, if there is one. It's just something to keep in mind!