Wednesday, July 14, 2010

Searching for Photographs

In my Amenuensis Monday post of last Monday I transcribed a letter in which descriptions of four photographs were given. These photo's were gifted to the City Archive of Middelburg, which is now a part of the Zeeland Archives. I wrote to them about a week ago asking if they could help me trace these pictures.

Yesterday I got a reply. They have been trying to find these photo's, but at the moment they aren't having much luck. They have not yet been digitalized, or if they were, they cannot be found using search terms provided by the descriptions.

The letter of the archivist, which states that they have been added to the collection, has been found, but which collection they were added to is not stated. They photographs also do not appear on the list of acquired items of 1988, the year in which they were added to the collection.

But, there is still hope. The archivist that got the letter and the photographs and wrote that they had been added to the collection still works for the Zeeland Archives. He's currently on holiday, but my enquiry has been forwarded to him. I hope that he might be able to find the photographs, once he returns from his holiday.

For now, all I can do is wait patiently...

Monday, July 12, 2010

Amenuensis Monday: Letter with Descriptions of Photo's

I'm joining in Amenuensis Monday, the weekly blogging theme hosted by John Newark of Transylvanian Dutch Genealogy. I will transcribe and translate documents, the transcriptions will go directly into my genealogy database and the translations will be posted here. The translations will be in modern language with modern spelling, as it's hard enough to translate already!

My current project is the Wesselo family documents of the generations I am researching this year. I'm starting with Lodewijk Wesselo, the eldest son of the second marriage of Hendrik Wesselo, and his wife Elisabeth Lubach.


This week a translation of a letter found in the family archive Wesselo at the CBG. It was written by D.J. Wesselo, the man who eventually gave the archive to the CBG. The recipient was the archivist of the city archive Middelburg. Included where four photographs, which were added to the collection of the archive according to a short letter also in the family archive. This last letter did not contain any usefull information, so I did not transcribe it.

Translation of letter written bij D.J. Wesselo to the Archive of Middelburg, dated 22 August 1988

From the estate of my cousin, Ms. Antje Wesselo – born in Voorschoten on 1 Novemeber 1902 and deceased in Rotterdam on 19 October 1986 – are the included memories of her from the period 1912-1920 when she lived with her parents in the city Middelburg. Because I did not see the usefulness of including these pictures in my family archive and on the other hand didn’t think it was sensible to destroy them, I thought it would be a good idea to offer them to you. Perhaps you know of someone who would appreciate them, if they are of no value to the city archive.

The father of the above named Antje was in the previously stated period the manager of the branch office of the Edelmetaalbedrijven van Kempen, of which the branch office in Middelburg was situated on the Lange Delft. Although Middelburg is virtually unknown to me, I was able to tracé this place with the help of the family pictures and letters I have in my possession. Accompanying the pictures:

I Previously this jewelry store was managed by one Mr. Van Gorcum en after Mr. Wesselo left in 1920 the store was sold to Mr. R. Verhoog. At which occasion this parade on the Lange Delft was held is unclear to me – on the back of the photograph is written: Middelburg 27/5 ’12. Considering the flags hanging from the front of the houses it must have been held for the occasion of a national occasion, at which the band ‘Mozart’ from Ierseke (with banner) provided her cooperation. On this photograph is on the left side the branch store of van Kempen visible, from which from the upstairs windows the family Wesselo shows their appreciation;
II Who Mr. De John is according to the backside is unclear to me, as is the place where the picture was taken;
III Is most likely a postcard pciture, which you might know from commercial sales;
IV Given the later added canopy roof, this picture will date from after 1912 (compare to picture I)

I hope that I have given you pleasure with the sending of these photographs.

Kindly,

D.J. Wesselo

Notes:

1. We learn two vital dates here for Antje Wesselo: her birth in Voorschoten on 1 Novemeber 1902 and her death in Rotterdam on 19 October 1986. Especially the last one is of interest, as the death certificate will not be public until 50 years after someone is deceased.
2. We learn that Lodewijk and his family lived in Middelburg from 1912-1920, when he was manager of the branch office of the Edelmetaalbedrijven (translation: precious metal companies) van Kempen, of which the branch office in Middelburg was situated on the Lange Delft.
3. On 27 May 1912, the family was already in Middelburg, and there was a parade, most likely for a national occasion. I’ve googled it, but have been unable to find what that might have been.
4. I have written to the Zeeland Archives, of which the city archive of Middelburg is now a part, in hopes they still have these pictures and are able to help me identify them. I hope to hear from them within the next two weeks.

Source:

Familiearchieven: CBG, fa 00472, familiearchief Wesselo, Doos 1, portfolio 1. "Letter to city archive Middelburg"

Thursday, July 8, 2010

What To Do: Chronological or by Topic?

I am almost through with gathering all of the material about Lodewijk Wesselo and when I am, I will start writing his story in a biography-like format. I have massive amounts of information and I have been thinking about how to approach this. I see two possibilities, each with their own benefits and downsides.

First there is doing it chronologically. I can start with his birth, his early work career, his marriage and children, late work career, some moves in between... Most of the things I have are dated and I have a fairly full timeline.

The benefit of doing it this way is clear, you can read the story and see his life unfold before your eyes. The downside? Not all of the information is dated, so some of the absolute gems of things I found I cannot accurately place on the timeline. For instance, I know he worked on an amazing project sometime before 1920, but when you take into account he started working in 1887, that's not saying much. So where do I put that? If it was just one instance, I would just guess, but there are more examples of this problem.

I could also do it by topic. I could do family life, extended family, religion, work, and health. With these topics I would be able to place every bit of information I have.

The benefits? The spare bits of information I have, those without a specific date, can be far more accurately placed within their given sub-topic. Most of the information I have is actually already arranged according to this pattern, so it's easy for me to organize it like this. The downside, of course, is that you might lose sight of Lodewijk's timeline like this, because while you can do the work topic chronologically, when you go to the next topic, you'd have to start at the beginning of his life again. I'm afraid of losing coherency between the subjects.

As of yet, I am still undecided. What are your thoughts on this? Which would work better in this case?

Tuesday, July 6, 2010

After 32 Years...

we have once again reached the finals of the World Cup!

I my post on last Tuesday I mentioned having to go up to Brazil, and we won! Tonight we played Uruguay and once again we won!

In the finals we will be playing against either Germany or Spain, which will be decided tomorrow.

We lost the World Cup final of 1974 against Germany and there's a love-hate relationship with our neighbors. It would give us a chance to take our revenge, but honestly, I'd rather we played against Spain. I'm afraid it will be Germany though...

Sunday is the day of the final, the day of reckoning. Will I see history being written then? Who knows?

Monday, July 5, 2010

Amenuensis Monday: Children Lodewijk Wesselo and Elizabeth Lubach

I'm joining in Amenuensis Monday, the weekly blogging theme hosted by John Newark of Transylvanian Dutch Genealogy. I will transcribe and translate documents, the transcriptions will go directly into my genealogy database and the translations will be posted here. The translations will be in modern language with modern spelling, as it's hard enough to translate already!

My current project is the Wesselo family documents of the generations I am researching this year. I'm starting with Lodewijk Wesselo, the eldest son of the second marriage of Hendrik Wesselo, and his wife Elisabeth Lubach.


Lodewijk and Elisabeth had three children, a son Hendrik who died seven days after he was born, a stillborn son and a daughter named Antje. Antje was the only one of the three children who lived to adulthood. She stayed single and died on 19 October 1986 in Rotterdam.

Today I’ve transcribed and translated the birth and death certificates of Lodewijk and Elisabeth’s children, in as far as they are available to the public. Italics are handwritten, the rest is printed.

Birth Certificate Hendrik Wesselo

In the year nineteen hundred on the twenty-third of the month April appeared before us, civil servant of the municipal registry of Voorschoten Lodewijk Wesselo, old twenty-four years, with the profession goldsmith living here, who has stated that on the twenty-first of the month April of this year in the afternoon at half past one hours, in this town in the house quarter A number nine a was born a child of the male sex, from his wife Elisabeth Lubach without profession living in his own house, which shall be named: Hendrik
This statement was made in the presence of Hendrik Wesselo, old fifty-nine years, with the profession silversmith, and of Dirk Lubach, old sixty years, with the profession silversmith, living both here
After reading it out loud this certificate was signed by us with the appearer and the witnesses

Notes:
1. Hendruk Wesselo is the father of Lodewijk
2. Dirk Lubach is the father of Elisabeth

Death Certificate Hendrik Wesselo

In the year nineteen hundred on the twenty-eight of the month April appeared before us, civil servant of the municipal registry of Voorschoten: Lodewijk Wesselo, old twenty-four years, with the profession goldsmith living here father of the hereafter named deceased and Hendrik Wesselo, old fifty-nine years, with the profession goldsmith living here grandfather of the deceased, who stated that on the twenty-eight of the month April of this year, in the afternoon at seven hours, in this town in the house quarter A number nine a has died Hendrik Wesselo, old seven days, with the profession without, born and living here son of the first appearer and of Elisabeth Lubach without profession living here
After reading aloud this certificate was signed by us with the appearers

Notes
1. The profession goldsmith given for Hendrik Wesselo is probably a mistake by the clerk who filled in the certificate. All other sources state that Hendrik was a silversmith, including the birth certificate given out not seven days before. Since Lodewijk is a goldsmith, the error is easily made.

Death Certificate NN Wesselo

In the year nineteen hundred and one on the ninth of the month October appeared before us, civil servant of the municipal registry of Voorschoten: Lodewijk Wesselo, old twenty-five years, with the profession goldsmith living here and Huibert van Kooij, old fifty-three years, with the profession state policeman living here, who stated that on the eight of the month October of this year, in the afternoon at one hours, in this town in the house quarter A number twelve has given birth to a child of the male sex Elisabeth Lubach, with the profession without and living here wife of the first appearer which child they declare stillborn
After reading aloud this certificate was signed by us with the appearers

Notes:
1. Between the death of Hendrik and the birth of their stillborn son, they either moved from number 9a to 12, or the houses in the quarter were re-numbered. To know this for sure, a visit to the land office is needed.
2. There’s a side note about the approval of the crossing out of the pre-printed text that was adapted to the declaring of a stillborn.

Birth Certificate Antje Wesselo

In the year nineteen hundred and two on the third of the month November appeared before us, civil servant of the municipal registry of Voorschoten Lodewijk Wesselo, old twenty-six years, with the profession goldsmith living here, who has stated that on the first of the month November of this year in the afternoon at half past seven hours, in this town in the house quarter A number twelve was born a child of the female sex, from his wife Elisabeth Lubach without profession living in his own house, which shall be named: Antje
This statement was made in the presence of Hendrik Wesselo, old sixty-two years, with the profession silversmith, and of Dirk Lubach, old sixty-two years, with the profession silversmith, living both here
After reading it out loud this certificate was signed by us with the appearer and the witnesses approving the crossing out of the word fourth

Notes:
1. The word crossed out fourth was written in front of the word third.

Sources:

1. Hendrik Wesselo entry, Geboorteakte, BS Voorschoten: Akte Jaar 1900 Nummer 25, Digitale Stamboom Regionaal Archief Leiden, Leiden, Zuid-Holland.
2. Hendrik Wesselo entry, BS Voorschoten Overlijdensakte, Akte Jaar 1900 Nummer 12, Digitale Stamboom Regionaal Archief Leiden, Leiden, Zuid-Holland.
3. NN Wesselo entry, BS Voorschoten Overlijdensakte, Akte Jaar 1901 Nummer 26, Digitale Stamboom Regionaal Archief Leiden, Leiden, Zuid-Holland.
4. Antje Wesselo entry, Geboorteakte, BS Voorschoten: Akte Jaar 1902 Nummer 72, Digitale Stamboom Regionaal Archief Leiden, Leiden, Zuid-Holland.